Rose Gum

Eucalyptus grandis

Location:  15th hole on the left side of the fairway 50 metres from the green

Other locations on course: 1st hole, 50 metres short of the bunker on the right.  
15th hole.  There are also several examples behind the 15th green to the right.
Origin & distribution: The coastal rainforest region of Queensland and northern New South Wales.
Height: to 50 metres.
Uses: A major plantation timber in Australia, South Africa and Brazil.  It is used for joinery, paneling and plywood.


The trunk is straight for two thirds of the tree and usually has a “skirt” of rough brownish bark for one to two metres.

The bark is thin and deciduous.  Rose gums shed their bark each year, in early summer, revealing a smooth powdery trunk with flowering patterns of silver, white, grey and light green.  Hollowed out branches near the crown provide vital roosting and nesting sites for mature birds and marsupials.  Its timber is rose red; softer than other eucalyptus timbers.

The species is prone to sudden limb failure. 

A rose gum situated north-west of Bulahdelah in the Wang-Wauk State Forest in New South Wales is almost 80 metres tall with a 9 metre circumference.  Many claim this to be the tallest tree in New South Wales. 

They are the fastest growing of the eucalypts. 

(source: Richard Allan & Kimball Baker) 


“May my life be like a great hospitable tree, and may weary travelers find in me a resting place”  (John Henry Jowett)